Saturday, December 31, 2016

Betrayed? By Islamist Terror!

"I was betrayed."
"All the security improvement and welfare information we were told we would find here turned out to be false."
"We got many promises, but it was a deception meant to make us leave [the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya]."
Madino Dhurow, Daryeel refugee camp, Mogadishu, Somalia
In this photo taken Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016, Somali refugee and mother of six Madino Dhurow, who was repatriated to Somalia from Kenya’s Dadaab camp, stands by her makeshift shelter in the Daryeel camp for the displaced, where she now lives in Mogadishu, Somalia. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)
Somali refugee and mother of six Madino Dhurow, who was repatriated to Somalia from Kenya’s Dadaab camp, stands by her makeshift shelter in the Daryeel camp for the... (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

"As opposed to what we were told, what we found here is all about insecurity incidents during the day and gangs preying into our camps to rob us of the little things we were given before."
"Whoever ventures to go outside will be killed."
Ali Haji, Somalian returnee from Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya

Just as refugees have been and are continuing to be created throughout the Middle East by terrorism imposed upon Muslims through ethnic, tribal and mostly sectarian animus, where the sacred writings of the Koran impose jihad on its faithful, to transform the world into one great Sharia-inspired caliphate, North Africa continues to go through its prolonged destination toward the Islamification of every aspect of life; no casual iteration of Islam is to be tolerated, it must sweep backward toward the purity of its initiation.

And in its initiation it represented a wide and ever-growing arc -- like a stone thrown into a pond's inexorable spread to its outer reaches, of world-absorption through violent conquest -- at which time the fulfillment of Islam's destiny will have been achieved. Only then may the faithful rest in the assurance that their mortal obligation to Islam will have reached its conclusion, when no other religions are left to which people will cleave; a time when those who spurned the imperative of Islam will all have been slaughtered.

The upheaval in Somalia has been ongoing  for decades, leaving some Somalian refugees considering the Dadaab refugee camp in eastern Kenya, their homes, for there they might have been born, 20 years earlier. The camp contained 260,000 Somalis who fled the 1991 civil war and the conflict and destabilization that has been the hallmark of Islamist strife ever since. al-Shabab took the initiative of a continuation of the murder and plundering.

The Nairobi government's announcement that it would close the sprawling refugee camp paired with its efforts to persuade Somali refugees to leave, to return to their country of origin, where normalization under a struggling government is proceeding at a snail's pace under great difficulties. The threat that al-Shabab continues to pose to the weak government has stalled its progress. So the Daryeel camp outside the capital is anything but a secure environment.

Families live there in homes made of sticks and plastic sheeting, little comfort in the monsoon rains, or protection from the armed gangs that roam about with impunity during the night-time hours. Each refugee family in the Kenyan refugee camp was informed that they would be safe and well looked after on their return to Somalia, and each was given a one-time United Nations cash support of $400 for anticipated expenses; funding that it was soon discovered, that melted quickly away.

 To the present, about 35,000 refugees have returned to Somalia voluntarily since 2014. To find the situation prevailing there no resemblance whatever to the promises that had convinced them  to return. There are reports of harassment and intimidation at the hands of the very Kenyan security agents that persuaded them to leave voluntarily. Obviously the process of emptying the Kenyan camp is a high priority and repatriation the essence of eventual success.

When the refugees return to Somalia, they are inevitably exposed to violence, amid risks to their very existence. Apart from the fact that they become susceptible to forcible recruitment into al-Shabab.

In this photo taken Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016, Somali children who were repatriated to Somalia from Kenya’s Dadaab camp, play in front of makeshift shelters in the Daryeel camp for the displaced, in Mogadishu, Somalia. (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)
In this photo taken Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016, Somali children who were repatriated to Somalia from Kenya’s Dadaab camp, play in front of makeshift shelters in the Daryeel camp for the displaced, in Mogadishu,... (AP Photo/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

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