Wednesday, August 24, 2016

What Ethical Impediments to the Presidency?

"It is outrageous to misrepresent Secretary Clinton's basis for meeting with these individual."
"[Reports present] a distorted portrayal of how often she crossed paths with individuals connected to charitable donations to the Clinton Foundation."
Brian Fallon, Clinton campaign spokesman

"There's a lot of potential conflicts and a lot of potential problems."
"The point is, she can't just walk away from these 6,000 donors."
Douglas White, nonprofits expert, past director, Columbia University's graduate fundraising management program
In this Aug. 16, 2016 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Philadelphia. More than half the people outside the government who met with Hillary Clinton while she was secretary of state gave money, either personally or through companies or groups, to the Clinton Foundation. It's an extraordinary proportion indicating her possible ethics challenges if elected president. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
Over fifty percent of those outside American government who happened to meet with then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton seemed to feel it was incumbent on them to donate either personally or via the corporations or groups they represented to handsomely benefit the Clinton Foundation operated by Bill Clinton. The appearance of an ethical dilemma appears never to have concerned this runner-up for the U.S. presidency up until the time it was brought to public attention by data leaks.

Of 154 individuals representing private interests who had met or engaged in telephone conversations with Hillary Clinton during her time at the State Department, 85 chose to give generously to the Clinton family charity. Commitments alternately were pledged to its international programs, affirmed by a review of State Department calendars and reported on by The Associated Press.

The 85 donors contributed a combined sum of $156 million, with an estimated 40 donors making good with over $100,000 each, while twenty of the donors released over $1-million each to the Clinton Foundation. A diverse group of people, granted meeting time with Secretary of State Clinton went on to express their appreciation for her time devoted to their requests or problems, by loosening purse strings.

Despite the aura of privilege, concession and obligation and the odour emanating from all of this, evidently there were no legal breaches committed. Access, however, linked to donations are that prevalent that a pattern emerges that cannot be overlooked for a singular lack of ethical consideration. At this date in proceedings former President Bill Clinton promises to step away from active collaboration with his charity should his wife be elected president.

And nor will the foundation in future, or at least during that time when and if she is elected, accept any donations out of country by independent philanthropic sources. "Gifts" from foreign groups, currently the norm, will no longer be accepted. Over six thousand donors have given the Clinton charity in excess of a grand $2-billion since 2000. Quite the legacy trading on resourceful privileged contact.

In this June 10, 2015 file photo, former U.S. President Bill Clinton speaks at annual gathering of the Clinton Global Initiative America, which is a part of The Clinton Foundation, in Denver. More than half the people outside the government who met with Hillary Clinton while she was secretary of state gave money, either personally or through companies or groups, to the Clinton Foundation. It's an extraordinary proportion indicating her possible ethics challenges if elected president. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Labels: , , ,

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home

Follow @rheytah Tweet